SHARON LAMB

Sharon is a Special IBTA Advisor and lives in San Francisco, United States.

Sharon trained as a psychiatric nurse at Kingston Psychiatric Hospital Nursing School in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. She then moved to Montreal Quebec, worked at the Montreal General Hospital , and moved to the Montreal Neurological Institute for a six month neuro-nursing post graduate six-month course.

After graduation she moved to New York City and helped two other nurses open a cardiac intensive suite for both adult medical patients and pediatric surgical patients.

Sharon’s neuroscience career started at UCSF Medical Center in the Neuro-radiology Department. After eight years of  nursing for all the neurological studies, she transferred to the neurosurgery department working for two surgeons who dealt with chronic pain management. She was the stereotaxic nurse for 20 years assisting in the operating room. Sharon then became the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) for neurosurgeon Dr. Mitchel Berger.

She later transferred to the Department of Nursing as the CNS for Neurosurgery, Neurology and Orthopedics. Prior to her retirement, Sharon worked at UCSF as the nurse manager for the Multiple Sclerosis Center. While working as the stereotaxic head nurse, Sharon started a brain tumor support group in San Francisco and, a few years later, one at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. These support groups continue to this day.

Sharon was one of the original Board members of Friends of Brain Tumor Research, a support agency of UCSF dedicated to helping Dr. Charles Wilson raise research dollars for the Brain Tumor Research Center he had established. That became the National Brain Tumor Foundation, and eventually that organization merged with the Brain Tumor Society of Boston to be renamed National Brain Tumor Society, on whose Board Sharon served.

Sharon remains active in the brain tumor community through her two support groups and referrals from all over the country, and the world for patients and families coping with this disease.

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